The Crossing Speed of Elderly Pedestrians

  • Ana Trpković University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
  • Marina Milenković University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
  • Milan Vujanić University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
  • Branimir Stanić University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
  • Draženko Glavić University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Keywords: elderly pedestrians, crossing speed, pedestrian crossing type, safety,

Abstract

The population of elderly people is rapidly growing and in terms of safety, senior pedestrians represent one of the most vulnerable group. The pedestrian crossing speed is a significant input parameter in traffic engineering, which can have effect on pedestrians’ safety, especially of older population. The objective of this study was to determine the value of the crossing speed of elderly pedestrians (65+) for different types of urban crossings. The research was conducted at ten intersections in the city of Belgrade, Serbia, using the method of direct observation and a questionnaire for collecting data. The data were analysed in the statistical software package IBM SPSS Statistics. The results showed that elderly pedestrians walk slower and the crossing type significantly influenced the speed of older population. The order of crossing types in relation to the measured speed is ranked as follows, from the lowest to the highest speed value: unsignalized, signalized, signalized with pedestrian countdown display, signalized with pedestrian island and pedestrian countdown display and finally signalized crossing with pedestrian island. According to the questionnaire results, the elderly recognize the importance of implementing pedestrian counters. This indicates the necessity to provide safe street crossing for the elderly using the corresponding engineering measures.

Author Biographies

Ana Trpković, University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Traffic Engineering Department
Marina Milenković, University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Traffic Engineering Department
Milan Vujanić, University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Traffic Safety Department
Branimir Stanić, University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Traffic Engineering Departement
Draženko Glavić, University of Belgrade, The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering

Traffic Engineering Department

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Published
2017-04-20
How to Cite
1.
Trpković A, Milenković M, Vujanić M, Stanić B, Glavić D. The Crossing Speed of Elderly Pedestrians. PROMET [Internet]. 2017Apr.20 [cited 2019Dec.7];29(2):175-83. Available from: http://traffic.fpz.hr/index.php/PROMTT/article/view/2101
Section
Articles

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