Evaluating the Impacts of Modern Streetcar Tracks on Bicycling Through an Intersection

Keywords: modern streetcar tracks, bicycling behavior, bicycle speed, acceleration and deceleration, bicycle delay

Abstract

Bicycle traffic flow suffers from the impact of tracks at an intersection in which a modern streetcar route is laid. The primary objective of this study involves discussing the impacts of modern streetcar tracks on bicycling through an intersection and developing a quantitative approach to calculate bicycle delay. Field investigations are conducted at eight sites in Nanjing and Shenyang, China. The sites are related to five intersections. Two of the five intersections are designed with a central modern streetcar style of track. Other two intersections operate on a roadside style of track and the last intersection is without tracks. The impact of the differences in bicycle speed are tested at each site based on the observed data. The results show that modern streetcar tracks exert a significant influence on bicycle speed and bicycling behavior and lead to delay, discomfort and unsafe conditions. Furthermore, a model is proposed to predict bicycle delay caused by modern streetcar tracks. The proposed model achieved a relatively accurate prediction. The findings of this study help in adequately understanding the impacts of modern streetcar tracks on bicycling. The results also suggest that longer crossing times should be used in signal design for bicycling at an intersection in which a modern streetcar route is laid.

Author Biographies

Baojie Wang, Chang'an University
Dr. Wang is a lecturer of Transportation Planning and Management at the Chang’an University in China, in the group of Prof. Yuan-qing Wang. His research concerns Traffic Control, Traffic Planning, and Traffic Choice Behavior. He leads multidisciplinary research teams on a project, which is focused on the signal control methodology of Intersections With a modern streetcar line. His research has attracted some attention and published some articles and patents.
Xiangbei Xue, Chang'an University
Xiangbei Xue is a Master Degree Candidate  of Transportation Planning and Management at the Chang’an University in China. He is doing research on travel behavior.
Xiaojian Hu, Southeast University
Dr. Hu is an Assistant Professor of Transportation Planning and Management at the Southeast University in China, in the group of Prof. Wei Wang. His research concerns Intelligent Transportation, Traffic Design, and Traffic Choice Behavior.

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Published
2019-02-26
How to Cite
1.
Wang B, Xue X, Hu X. Evaluating the Impacts of Modern Streetcar Tracks on Bicycling Through an Intersection. PROMET [Internet]. 2019Feb.26 [cited 2019Oct.15];31(1):49-. Available from: https://traffic.fpz.hr/index.php/PROMTT/article/view/2785
Section
Articles